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NEWS | May 26, 2010

CENTCOM HQ construction passes milestone

By None , U.S. Central Command

Maj. Gen. Kenneth S. Dowd, (J4) logistics director, U.S. Central Command, signs the last structural beam before it is put in place during construction of USCENTCOM's new headquarters building.
Maj. Gen. Kenneth S. Dowd, (J4) logistics director, U.S. Central Command, signs the last structural beam before it is put in place during construction of USCENTCOM’s new headquarters building.
MACDILL AFB, Fla. (May 27, 2010) – Construction of the new U.S. Central Command headquarters reached a significant milestone last month as the last steel beam was set in place, completing the structural frame.

 
Construction of the new USCENTCOM headquarters began in June 2009 to alleviate space deficiencies and enhance needed command and control capabilities that were missing from the 30-year-old current headquarters. 

With the structural frame complete, construction crews can focus their efforts on the exterior walls of the building and eventually the interior. Current personnel at USCENTCOM can see the new structure taking shape everyday as new exterior walls are added. 

Maj. Gen. Kenneth Dowd, (J4) logistics director, USCENTCOM, toured the construction site with his staff during this important milestone and signed the last beam before it was emplaced, leaving their permanent mark in the history of this new structure. 
 
“It was a real life memory to sign the last of the structural beams to be put in place,” said Cmdr. Tom Anderson, headquarters construction liaison, “Even though it will not be visible once construction is complete, I will always know that it is there and that in some small way I was part of something bigger than myself.” 

Bigger is right, as the new building is a four story, 258,730-square-foot structure that will include a remote secured entry control point and new food service and dining functions. About 1,800 personnel are scheduled to occupy the new office spaces in the summer of 2011.  

Construction for the new U.S. Central Command headquarters began June 2009. The new building is a four story, 258,730-square-foot structure that will include a remote secured entry control point and a new food service and dining facility. The facility will also meet all requirements to be Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certified.
Construction for the new U.S. Central Command headquarters began June 2009. The new building is a four story, 258,730-square-foot structure that will include a remote secured entry control point and a new food service and dining facility. The facility will also meet all requirements to be Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certified.

Not only will this be a much larger building, the facility will also meet all requirements in order to be Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certified. 

"The new CENTCOM HQ facility meets all LEED certification requirements,” Anderson said. “LEED certification is third-party verification that a building is designed and built using strategies aimed at improving performance metrics of energy savings, water efficiency, CO2 emissions reduction, improved environmental quality, and stewardship of resources and sensitivity to their impacts.”

The project will not stop at being environmentally friendly. To the delight of many current USCENTCOM employees who take the long walk from their cars to their offices, the old headquarters building will be demolished and a reception center with more than 400 parking spaces will be constructed in its place. Construction of a four-story parking garage is scheduled to begin in 2012 and will hold more than 1,300 vehicles. 


The continued construction projects will also contribute to the local community by employing as many as 350 people during its peak construction periods.

"This facility is very important to the local community as well and will create hundreds of jobs," said Gen. David Petraeus, commander, USCENTCOM. "Central Command has long been in need for a new headquarters and all members will benefit and take pride in working in such a facility."

"Some members of the staff will even be able to see light for the first time in years," he jokingly added.